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The death of the internet

October 14, 2020 | internet | No Comments

It’s too bad that presidential campaigns are so personal, because in truth they’re policy wars. “Who’d you rather have a beer with?” might be easier to answer than “who’s got the better approach to regulating the internet?”, but the latter is far more important.  



Kelly Evans et al. sitting at a table using a laptop computer: CNBC's Kelly Evans


© Provided by CNBC
CNBC’s Kelly Evans

I mention all this because the FCC is set to finalize its repeal of “net neutrality” at the end of the month. Remember “net neutrality”? I certainly do, because of its peculiar premise not so much to address a major existing consumer harm, but to prevent one from coming into being. But even after its repeal, those harms –giving “fast lanes” to certain content and slowing others–haven’t really borne out. The only recent examples I could find were of Sprint reportedly throttling Skype in 2018, and Verizon throttling Santa Clara firefighters for what turned out to be going over

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a man standing in front of a building


© Kritika Vaid | India.com Entertainment Desk



Moj is an Indian video platform app just like TikTok that is created for netizens to showcase their creative talents. The app has started a campaign #MojwithRitviz. Ritviz is an internet music sensation and has been creating music for over the past five years. Some of his biggest hits include songs like Udd Gaye, Liggi, Jeet and Sage, each clocking over 20 million views. Most recently he was part of a mini-series documenting life in the lockdown. He has over 1.5 million subscribers on his YouTube channel. The hashtag already saw over 200 million video plays, with celebrity influencers like Aadil Khan, Mukti Mohan, Shivani Kapila and many more have participated in the campaign. While launching his album on Moj, Ritviz said: “It has been a great experience collaborating with Moj, especially given the restraints of the 30-second timeline for the songs. Keeping
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Governments around the world have seized on the coronavirus crisis as an opportunity to expand digital surveillance and harvest more data on their citizens, according to a report out Wednesday from Freedom House, a democracy and human rights research group.

Why it matters: Privacy advocates have warned since early in the pandemic that the tech behind efforts to conduct contact tracing and enforce quarantines and other public safety protocols could be abused and made permanent, particularly in authoritarian countries like China.

What’s happening, according to the report:

Dozens of countries have rolled out government-backed contact-tracing apps without effective laws to protect people from overly expansive data collection.

  • China, Russia, India, Singapore, Ecuador and Bahrain were among the countries that Freedom House found implemented apps that either send reams of data unchecked to government servers or make invasive data and health documentation demands.

Governments in at least 28 countries censored

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Activating validation services for route origin, TWNIC continues to safeguard Internet routing security with RPKI

People are growingly reliant on the Internet for work, school and daily activities. The impact to people’s life will be unthinkable should the Internet suddenly stop working. Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is one of the key elements that allow the Internet to maintain smooth operation. BGP hijacking, whether as a result of intentional attack by hackers or unintentional configuration errors, causes disruption to Internet services and even threats to information security. There can be serious consequences, so every government agency, private corporation and individual are obligated to prevent this from happening.

The Taiwan Network Information Center (TWNIC) has been actively promoting Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI) with an aim to enhance Internet routing security since the official signing of TWNIC RPKI Certificate Authority (CA) with the Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC) on September 28,

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Internet freedom has declined for the 10th consecutive year as governments around the world are using the coronavirus pandemic as a “cover” to expand online surveillance, crack down on dissent, and build new technological systems to control society, Freedom House says in a new report.

The Washington-based human rights watchdog’s annual Freedom Of The Net report, released on October 14, said the authorities in dozens of countries have cited COVID-19 “to justify expanded surveillance powers and the deployment of new technologies that were once seen as too intrusive.”

As a result, Internet freedom has worsened in 26 of the 65 countries covered by the report, while only 22 registered gains.

And just 20 percent of the estimated 3.8 billion people using the Internet live in countries with a free Internet, according to the democracy research group.

Myanmar, Kyrgyzstan, India, Ecuador, and Nigeria suffered the largest declines during the coverage period

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Internet solutions for under-serviced areas

October 14, 2020 | internet | No Comments

By Opinion Time of article published29m ago

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By: Floyd Matlala

It was the lack of satellite internet connectivity in remote areas that inspired the birth of Samford Satellite Internet Solutions, a newly emerging tech solution company which seeks to uplift under-serviced areas in South Africa by bringing a high speed internet connectivity to their doorstep at a lower cost.

Samford Solutions in collaboration with MorClick, a telecommunications company that offers cutting-edge broadband satellite services, recognised that one of the only ways to bring internet connectivity to areas such as farms was through satellite as it is not commercially viable to lay down fibre in these areas, or invest further in ADSL.

Brian Ford, Executive Director of Samford Solutions said due to data options from Mobile Network Offerings (MNOs) that are expensive and in some cases with stability being an issue, satellite internet connectivity

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Getty Images, Toni Anne Barson / Contributor

After a paparazzi image of Billie Eilish made its way to the internet over the weekend, the thing that Eilish anticipated would happen happened—she was criticized for her body. But, of all the things we’re willing to put up with in the year 2020, criticizing an 18 year old for her appearance is simply not one of them, and the internet is shutting down body-shaming trolls left, right, and center.

In a 2019 ELLE Magazine feature, Eilish, who was then just 17, noted that she wears oversized clothing to keep the critics at bay. “I have to wear a big shirt for you not to feel uncomfortable about my boobs,” she said. “I was born with fucking boobs, bro,” and if she wears anything remotely form-fitting, social media instantly reminds her of that, and not in a nice way.

So, when Eilish stepped

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a close up of a box: Internet freedom in India declined for a third year: Report


© Carlsen Martin
Internet freedom in India declined for a third year: Report

Internet freedom in India declined for a third straight year, as government authorities increasingly shut off connectivity to suppress anti-Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) protests, said a report.

The Freedom House report said spyware campaigns targeting human rights defenders added to the already restrictive environment for privacy.

“Meanwhile, both the CAA protests and the COVID-19 pandemic led to an information environment plagued by disinformation, often pushed by political leaders themselves. Within this environment, women, religious, and marginalized communities, in particular, experienced online harassment and trolling,” the report said.

The report said despite the Supreme Court establishing certain safeguards to be followed by the government before ordering internet shutdowns, India still registered to be home to more government-imposed internet shutdowns than anywhere else in the world.

The move was justified by authorities for reasons including the need to counter

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As anyone who lives in Los Angeles will tell you, iceberg lettuce seems to be on the outs while kale still has a hold on the gourmet restaurant community.

For every trendy restaurant that serves avocado toast, there’s another that serves some sort of high-end kale salad with several expensive garnishes. Whole Foods even sells T-shirts with just the word “kale” on them.

A recent opinion piece from Bloomberg pointing out the shifting tides in the lettuce world, however, has brought out some serious opinions on the topic and it turns out there are still plenty of iceberg devotees.

The story, appropriately titled “America Has Lost Its Taste for Iceberg Lettuce,” argues that this year could be the year romaine and other leaf lettuce “finally surpasses that of head lettuce, which is mostly iceberg lettuce.”

That same article also says it might not…which is fair, given the state of

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WASHINGTON – A mobile app launched last week in China that many there hoped would allow access to long banned Western social media sites abruptly disappeared from Chinese app stores a day after its unveiling.

Tuber, an Andriod app backed by Chinese cyber security software giant Qihoo 360, first appeared to be officially available last Friday. It offered Chinese citizens limited access to websites such as YouTube, Facebook and Google, and it facilitated some 5 million downloads following its debut.

Yet a day later, the Tuber app disappeared from mobile app stores, including one run by Huawei Technologies Co. A search for the app’s website yielded no results when VOA checked Monday. It’s unclear whether the government ordered the takedown of the app.

Experts told VOA that such ventures are sometimes designed to create the illusion of choice to users eager to gain access to the global internet, but these

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