Tag Archive : Encryption

/ Encryption

  • A transnational coalition of intelligence agencies called for tech companies to weaken encryption standards.
  • The tension of end-to-end encryption highlights the power tech companies have amassed to establish consumer privacy norms. 
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Over the weekend, the transnational alliance of intelligence agencies Five Eyes called for tech companies to provide law enforcement agencies with backdoor access to data transmitted via end-to-end encryption (E2EE).

Apple

Apple has attempted to protect consumer privacy against perceived threats from competitors and the US government.

Mark Lennihan/AP


Japan and India also signed the statement from Five Eyes, whose member nations include Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK, and the US. With E2EE, only message senders and receivers can access the transmitted data—by definition, E2EE doesn’t allow for backdoors, which enable

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On Monday, the US Department of Justice signed on to a new international statement warning of the dangers of encryption and calling for an industry-wide effort to enable law enforcement agencies to access encrypted data once a warrant has been obtained. The US was joined in the effort by officials representing the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India, and Japan.

The statement begins by acknowledging the value of encryption in protecting free expression across the world, citing a 2017 report from the UN Human Rights Commission. But the statement quickly pivots to the ostensible problems posed by the technology.

“Particular implementations of encryption technology, however, pose significant challenges to public safety,” the statement reads. “We urge the industry to address our serious concerns where encryption is applied in a way that wholly precludes any legal access to content.”

The Justice Department has a long history of anti-encryption advocacy. In 2018,

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The US Department of Justice, in conjunction with the “Five Eyes” nations, has issued a statement asking Apple and other tech companies to effectively create backdoors that will weaken encryption strength overall to provide law enforcement access to data.

In a statement released on Sunday by the US Department of Justice, the “International Statement: End-to-End Encryption and Public Safety” is a continuation of the long-running encryption debate. In the latest salvo in the ongoing war, representatives of governments from multiple countries are demanding access to encrypted data for the sake of sexually exploited children.

The lengthy statement demands tech companies “embed the safety of the public in system designs” relating to encryption, to enable companies to “act against illegal content and activity effectively with no reduction to safety,” while enabling law enforcement to do its job. This includes enabling law enforcement officials “access to content in a readable and

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The governments of seven countries are calling on Facebook and other tech firms to do the technically impossible – to weaken encryption by giving law enforcement access to messages, whilst not reducing user safety.

The governments of the U.S., U.K., Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India and Japan have issued the joint statement which pleads with Facebook specifically, as well as other tech firms, to drop “end-to-end encryption policies which erode the public’s safety online”.

The governments once again raise the issue of child abusers and terrorists using encrypted services such as WhatsApp to send messages without fear of content being intercepted.

“We owe it to all of our citizens, especially our children, to ensure their safety by continuing to unmask sexual predators and terrorists operating online,” the U.K.’s home secretary, Priti Patel, said in a statement.

“It is essential that tech companies

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