Tag Archive : Facebooks

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a group of oranges in a pile: Getty


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Getty

  • A Canadian garden center had its Facebook ad for onion seeds taken down by the platform on Monday.
  • Facebook said the ad was removed for breaking its rules on “products with overtly sexual positioning.”
  • Facebook’s head of comms in Canada said the post had been restored on Wednesday, and that it had been initially removed by the platform’s automated moderation systems.
  • “We use automated technology to keep nudity off our apps. But sometimes it doesn’t know a walla walla onion from a, well, you know.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook’s AI struggles to tell the difference between sexual pictures of the human body and globular vegetables.

A garden center in Newfoundland, Canada on Monday received a notice from Facebook about an ad it had uploaded for Walla Walla onion seeds that contained a photo of some onions.

Facebook’s notice said the ad broke its

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Over the past several weeks, there has been an increasing clamour for Facebook to place its India public policy head, Ankhi Das, on leave as the company continues with an audit of its India operations.

The impetus for the audit was an article written by the Wall Street Journal in mid-August. In that piece, WSJ reported that Das had resisted against taking down inflammatory content that eventually sparked rioting in the capital city of Delhi as it was posted by members of the nationalist BJP party. 

The riots left over fifty dead, most of whom were Muslims. It also led to many of these Muslims’ homes being torched.

“The company’s top public-policy executive in the country, Ankhi Das, opposed applying the hate-speech rules to [T Raja] Singh and at least three other Hindu nationalist individuals and groups flagged internally for promoting or participating in violence,” WSJ reported.

These inflammatory posts

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Representative David Cicilline, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, said on Wednesday he would be “comfortable with unwinding” Facebook Inc’s acquisition of Instagram.

The antitrust subcommittee on Tuesday released a report on Big Tech’s abuses of market power but stopped short of naming specific companies or acquisitions that must be broken up.

Cicilline, a Democrat from Rhode Island, told Reuters in an interview that Facebook should not have been allowed to buy Instagram, a deal that the Federal Trade Commission approved in 2012.

“I would be comfortable with unwinding that. I think that’s the right answer,” he said.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment. It has said previously that Instagram was insignificant at the time it was purchased and that Facebook built it into the success it has become.

Any effort to unwind the deal would entail the government

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A person in a Hazmat suit covers the Facebook logo with warning tape.

Facebook is pushing yet another set of new features and policies designed to minimize harm in the homestretch to Election Day while also increasing “community” for users. But these features will do nothing to mitigate existing problems—and they will likely cause new, more widespread harms to both users and to society.

The most recent issue is a frustrating set of changes to the way that Facebook handles groups. Last week, Facebook announced yet another new way to “help more people find and connect with communities,” by putting those communities in your face whether you want to see them or not. Both the groups tab and your individual newsfeed will promote group content from groups you are not subscribed to in the hope that you will engage with the content and with the group.

These changes are new, small inconveniences piled atop frustrating user-experience decisions that Facebook has been making for

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“Privacy matters,” Facebook declared on Wednesday, September 30, before announcing major updates to its Instagram and Messenger platforms, enabling each of the billion-plus user bases to communicate across the divide. You’re allowed a wry smile at this point. This has nothing to do with privacy and everything to do with data. “Messaging should be fast, reliable and fun,” Facebook went on to say, “no matter what app you use.” There’s a new messaging war now underway as the hyper-scale platforms become goldmines. And Facebook is winning.

The gorilla in the messaging cage is WhatsApp, of course, also owned by Facebook, and while CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced last year that all his messengers, WhatsApp included, would hook up at the back-end, WhatsApp is out of the mix for now. Neither Instagram’s direct messaging nor Facebook Messenger encrypt end-to-end by default, and rather than throwing resource into fixing that real problem,

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Illustration for article titled Facebooks Dilemma, Subpoena Time, and Twitter: There Was an Attempt

Image: Exposure Labs/Netflix

HellfeedHellfeedHellfeed is your bimonthly resource for news on the current heading of the social media garbage barge.

It’s time for Hellfeed, your biweekly summary of who’s kicking and screaming online, and we really couldn’t have picked a better day: The president tweeted that he is ill with the novel coronavirus this morning and then totally dropped off the goddamn radar.

While the nation waits for updates on the president’s condition—the White House has quietly upgraded the severity of his coronavirus infection from “mild” to “very moderate”—it is simultaneously hooting, claiming it’s a hoax, preparing for chaos, demanding civility, and generally not having any idea what the hell is going to happen next. This really caps off two weeks of everything breaking, which we’ve summarized below.

Facebook hits back at The Social Dilemma

The Social Dilemma, Netflix’s documentary on the deliberate

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Facebook says it has deployed a feature in its Community Help hub to make it easier for users to assist each other during the pandemic. As of this week, AI will detect when a public post on News Feed is about needing or offering help and will surface a suggestion to share it on Community Help. Once a post is moved or published directly to the hub, an algorithm will recommend matches between people.

For example, if someone posts an offer to deliver groceries, they’ll see recommendations within Community Help to connect with people who recently posted about needing this type of assistance. Similarly, if someone requests masks, AI will surface suggested neighbors who recently posted an offer to make face coverings.

Building this Community Help feature, which Facebook says is available in all countries in English and 17 other languages, involved a difficult engineering challenge because the system needs

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Today, let’s talk about a couple little things that could turn into a big thing.

In January 2019, Mike Isaac reported a noteworthy development about Facebook at the New York Times. In the months to come, he said, Facebook would unify the technical infrastructure powering Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp. To the user, these changes would be invisible. But to Facebook itself, there were clear strategic imperatives to merge the apps. Among them: the move came just as the US government was beginning to consider an effort to break the company up.

In the nearly two years since, the government’s effort has accelerated. On September 15th, the Wall Street Journal reported that an antitrust case against the company could come by the end of the year. But Facebook’s effort to puree its family of apps into a single software smoothie on the back end has picked up as well. And

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Facebook critics say the social network needs to do more to safeguard the US elections.


Angela Lang/CNET

Some of Facebook’s most prominent critics on Wednesday called on the social network to take steps to safeguard democracy ahead of the US elections in November, accusing it of not enforcing its own rules against inciting violence.

The group calls itself the Real Facebook Oversight Board and is made up of high-profile journalists, activists, academics, politicians and business people. Members include Facebook investor Roger McNamee, Filipino-American journalist Maria Ressa (who co-founded the news site Rappler), Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt, Color of Change President Rashad Robinson and UK Parliament member Damian Collins.

During a press conference on Wednesday, the group outlined a list of demands for Facebook. The social network should

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