Tag Archive : Researchers

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A collaborative project between 3D image analysis software company Lume VR Ltd. and scientists at the University of Cambridge showed off a new virtual reality tool today that gives scientists a new view of the inner workings of human cells.

The researchers hope the Google Street View-style tool will provide an up close and personal way to understand fundamental problems in biology to help new treatments for disease. The details are published in the scientific journal “Nature Methods.”

By using VR, scientists can “walk” through the “byways” and “highways” within the cells themselves and see proteins fold and unfold. They also can potentially see where things go wrong when they go wrong and even rewind biological processes by looking through recorded and visualized datasets.

The software, vLUME, uses super-high-resolution microscopy data that is collected, collated and digested. After that, the data needs to be rendered in a manner understandable by

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A moth carries a tiny lightweight sensor on its back.


Mark Stone/University of Washington

Moths aren’t known as beasts of burden, but a new super lightweight sensor they can carry on their backs might change that.

A team of researchers at the University of Washington (UW) developed a sensor that weighs 98 milligrams (one tenth the weight of a jellybean) and can survive a six-story fall. The sensors are designed to last three years and collect and wirelessly transmit environmental data like temperature or humidity. 

The tough little sensors can be delivered by dainty drones or carried on the backs of insects. A video released by UW shows both of these options in action. The hawkmoth shown in the footage is a large species of moth and the sensor fits easily on its back.

“This

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A security flaw in an internet-connected male chastity device could allow hackers to remotely lock it — leaving users trapped, researchers have warned.

The Cellmate, produced by Chinese firm Qiui, is a cover that clamps on the base of the male genitals with a hardened steel ring, and does not have a physical key or manual override.

The locking mechanism is controlled with a smartphone app via Bluetooth — marketed as both an anti-cheating and a submission sex play device — but security researchers have found multiple flaws that leave it vulnerable to hacking.

“We discovered that remote attackers could prevent the Bluetooth lock from being opened, permanently locking the user in the device. There is no physical unlock,” British security firm Pen Test Partners said Tuesday.

“An angle grinder or other suitable heavy tool would be required to cut the wearer free.”

The firm also found other security flaws

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PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — More than 3 million Americans and almost 25 percent of Pennsylvanians have osteoarthritis, a debilitating joint disease.

Currently, there is no cure. Osteoarthritis contributes to the hundreds of thousands of joint replacement surgeries performed in the U.S. each year.

Local researchers are now using artificial intelligence to identify the disease much sooner, along with a possible cure.

“This is allowing us to follow along with what the computer is seeing,” said Dr. Ken Urish, a researcher at UPMC.

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University have designed computer software that detects osteoarthritis years before symptoms develop.

“The biggest lesson I have learned from my job is that people completely take for granted the ability to walk a block and not have it hurt,” said Dr. Urish.

The disease is typically diagnosed using a standard grayscale MRI. It’s only visible once the cartilage has

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Researchers will be able to gain a deeper understanding of what’s considered the world’s oldest surviving (digital) computer after its long-lost user manual was unearthed. The Z4, which was built in 1945, runs on tape, takes up most of a room and needs several people to operate it. The machine now takes residence at the Deutsches Museum in Munich, but it hasn’t been used in quite some time.

An archivist at ETH Zurich, Evelyn Boesch, discovered the manual among her father’s documents in March, according to retired lecturer Herbert Bruderer (via Motherboard). René Boesch worked with the Swiss Aeronautical Engineering Association, which was based at the university’s Institute for Aircraft Statics and Aircraft Construction. The Z4 was housed there in the early 1950s.

Among Boesch’s documents were notes on math problems the Z4 solved that were linked to the development of the P-16 jet fighter. “These included calculations on

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