Tag Archive : Store

/ Store

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the TechCrunch series that recaps the latest OS news, the applications they support and the money that flows through it all.

Loading...

Load Error

The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 204 billion downloads and $120 billion in consumer spending in 2019. People are now spending three hours and 40 minutes per day using apps, rivaling TV. Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours — they’re a big business. In 2019, mobile-first companies had a combined $544 billion valuation, 6.5x higher than those without a mobile focus.

In this series, we help you keep up with the latest news from the world of apps, delivered on a weekly basis.

Apple declared monopoly by U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust

Apple was one of the four big tech companies the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust declared as having enjoyed

Read More

The Proud Boys, an FBI-designated extremist group with ties to white nationalism, lost its web host for the group’s website and online store following efforts from advocacy group Color of Change.

“After a heads up from Color of Change, we notified one of our customers — a website hoster — who then took action. The websites in question were not Google Cloud customers,” a Google Cloud spokesperson told TheWrap on Friday.

As of Friday evening, however, the extremist group appears to have gotten a new host for its website, but the online store is not currently taking orders and a note to online customers says that the “migration to a new webhost has taken longer than anticipated.”

Also Read: Vice Media CEO Assures Staff That Founder Gavin McInnes, Who Also Launched Proud Boys, Has No Ties to Company Anymore

Still, Rashad Robinson, the president of Color of Change, praised Google

Read More

  • A US judge in California ruled Friday that Apple could bar Epic Games’s “Fortnite” game from its App Store, but the tech company must not harm Epic’s developer tools business.
  • “The Court maintains its findings from the temporary restraining order and hereby grants in part and denies in part Epic Games’ motion for a preliminary injunction,” District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled.
  • Last month, Epic Games had filed for a preliminary injunction that would put its game back in the App Store and restore its developer account after Apple terminated Epic Games’ account on its App Store.
  • Epic sued Apple in August alleging anticompetitive behavior. The lawsuit came after Epic rolled out its own payment system in the popular Fortnite video game.
  • Apple does not allow such alternative payment systems and removed Fortnite from the App Store and threatened to terminate Epic’s developer accounts, which would have affected Epic’s other
Read More

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal judge ruled Friday that Apple did not need to reinstate the popular video game Fortnite in its App Store, in a blow to Fortnite’s parent company, Epic Games, which is locked in an antitrust battle with the tech giant over its app store fees and rules.

Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers of the Northern District of California said in her ruling that Apple’s ban of the game could continue because Epic had violated its contract with Apple. There is “significant public interest” in requiring companies to adhere to contracts or resolve disputes through the normal course, she wrote.

But Gonzales Rogers also said that Apple could not ban Unreal Engine, Epic’s developer tools, from its platforms because of the “potential significant damage to both developers and gamers” who rely on the software.

The mixed ruling showed the high cost of taking on a tech behemoth like

Read More

A federal judge denied a request from Epic Games to force Apple to reinstate Epic’s Fortnite game on the App Store while awaiting the results of an antitrust lawsuit.

U.S. District Court judge Yvonne Gonzales Rogers also ruled in favor of Epic, permanently granting a prior temporary order that stops Apple from retaliating against Epic by removing support for Epic’s Unreal Engine.

The antitrust lawsuit began August 13 when Epic announced a discount policy and direct payment mechanism for Fortnite that Apple and Google said violated their respective terms of service. Epic CEO Tim Sweeney has long argued that the 30% commissions the big companies take of every game transaction is unfair and that Epic should be able to directly sell its in-app goods to players for lower prices. Epic only charges 12% as a fee for developers in its own store.

After Epic modified the iOS version of Fortnite

Read More

001-playstation-5.png

The PS5 consoles are set to appear next month.


Sony

The PlayStation 5 is scheduled to arrive in the US in November, and in anticipation of the event, Sony will stop selling PlayStation 3, PSP or Vita games in the web and mobile PlayStation Store, EuroGamer reported Friday.

According to the report, Sony has notified its development partners that the web and mobile versions of the PlayStation Store will stop selling PlayStation 3, PSP or Vita games timed with a relaunch of the store on Oct. 19 and ahead of the PS5 launch in November.

Among the items Sony will remove are PlayStation 3 games and add-ons, PSP games and add-ons, PlayStation Vita games and add-ons, apps, themes and avatars. The items will still be available in the

Read More

microsoft-logo-laptop-3802

Angela Lang/CNET

Microsoft announced 10 new app store principles in a blog post Thursday, needling Apple’s and Google’s policies in the process. The new guidelines from Microsoft are intended to promote choice, fairness and innovation for software developers on Windows 10.

“Developers will have the freedom to choose whether to distribute their apps for Windows through our app store. We will not block competing app stores on Windows.” the first principle reads.

“Windows 10 is an open platform. Unlike some other popular digital platforms, developers are free to choose how they distribute their apps,” the tech giant wrote, alluding to Apple and Google.

Those companies are embroiled in a legal battle with Fortnite developer Epic over fees they charge in their respective app stores.

Earlier this month, lawmakers

Read More

If you prefer buying older PlayStation games over the web or on mobile, you may not be able to do that for much longer. Sony has informed developers that it plans to revamp its digital storefront for those versions later this month, removing users’ options to purchase games and DLC released initially on the PS3, PSP, and Vita from a mobile device or PC, Planète Vita reports.

Effective October 19th, the PlayStation web store will remove that option, according to Planète Vita and the mobile app’s update will be available on October 28th. Users will still be allowed to make new purchases for PlayStation legacy titles, but they will have to purchase them directly from PS3, PSP, Vita, or PS4 gaming consoles. However, it is important to note that this only applies to new purchases, and any previous purchases for any legacy PlayStation titles and downloadable content will remain accessible

Read More

Microsoft published and committed to following a list of 10 principles in its treatment of third-party apps on Windows, capitalizing on the ongoing backlash against Apple over the iPhone maker’s revenue sharing policies and restrictions on cloud streaming services in the iOS App Store.

The commitments include giving developers “the freedom to choose whether to distribute their apps for Windows through our app store,” and promising to allow competing app stores on Windows. In addition, Microsoft said in the post that it “will not block an app from Windows based on a developer’s business model or how it delivers content and services, including whether content is installed on a device or streamed from the cloud.”

The principles, published Thursday morning by Rima Alaily, Microsoft deputy general counsel, largely restate Microsoft’s existing practices. The company says it’s building on the ideas of the Coalition for App Fairness, which includes Epic Games,

Read More

Microsoft is making some firm commitments to the future of app stores on Windows today. The software giant has published 10 principles it’s adopting as promises to app developers, including that it won’t block competing stores on the platform or block specific business models an app may use to make money.

The principles also cover Microsoft holding its own apps to the same standards as competing apps and a commitment to “charge reasonable fees” that are reflective of rival app stores on Windows. Microsoft also says it won’t block apps on Windows based on a developer’s choice of in-app payment systems.

These new principles are a clear response to app store issues surrounding both Apple and Google — in particular, Epic Games’ ongoing legal battle with Apple. Epic Games implemented its own payment system inside Fortnite on both iOS and Android, breaching Apple and Google’s policies and forcing developers

Read More