Tag Archive : Students

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If women are underrepresented in computer science (and they are, by a large margin), you wouldn’t know it from sitting in on the Grace Hopper Celebration. Each fall, for the last 20 years, tens of thousands of women have converged for a long weekend of collaboration, networking, mentoring and commemoration of their contributions to the tech world.

COVID-19 pushed this fall’s convention into a virtual format, but it didn’t prevent the University of Denver’s Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science from sending 26 students (plus seven faculty and one staff member) for free. A private donor and funds from the school’s diversity, equity and inclusion budget covered the costs.

In interviews via email and Zoom, the DU Newsroom asked Anndi Russell, a graduate student in the data science program; Izzy Johnson, an undergraduate pursuing a BS in computer science; and Scott Leutenegger, a computer science professor and the Ritchie

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“You come on any time,” Benkendorf said from Sunrise, Fla. “I’ve got a dog you can play with. I’ve got a spare room. Anytime you need a vacation. If they close you down again, Stacie, you’re welcome.”

Weldon and Benkendorf have never met in-person, but over the past four months they’ve developed a friendship after matching with each other on a website. Quarantine Buddy, founded by two Cornell University students in April, matches people from around the world based on their background and interests, and they meet virtually.

The website has helped more than 50,000 people — spanning all 50 U.S. states and more than 100 countries — build friendships while stuck at home.

“We kind of realized how lonely and isolating this can be for so many people,” said Jordyn Goldzweig, a Quarantine Buddy co-founder. “The pandemic itself really brought out the fact that a lot of people are

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Countless parents in East St. Louis say they are relying on minimal resources while struggling to gain internet access to help their children participate in remote learning at area schools during the coronavirus pandemic.

East St. Louis is a largely Black community where nearly 40% of residents live below the federal poverty line, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Melissa Lawson, a single mother of three who lives there while juggling multiple jobs, told the Belleville News-Democrat that she already had to make adjustments to get by before the pandemic after being severely injured in a car accident. She said some of the cutbacks included canceling internet service.

“Sometimes, we would go to a McDonald’s parking lot and use their Wi-Fi, and even with that, you only get so much with the hotspot,” Lawson noted. “Then you run into the problem of what if my laptop

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LAS CRUCES – As online education becomes the new normal, many low-income families are struggling to find resources to allow their children to fully participate in classes. Nearly one-quarter of New Mexico’s students lack equipment and internet access at home.



a person standing in front of a brick building: Rosario Pando, assistant librarian of the Columbus Village Library sits at a computer in the library. Thanks to a $50,000 grant, New Mexico State University's computer science department is working with the Columbus Village Library to provide needed access to computers and internet access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.


© Courtesy photo / New Mexico State University
Rosario Pando, assistant librarian of the Columbus Village Library sits at a computer in the library. Thanks to a $50,000 grant, New Mexico State University’s computer science department is working with the Columbus Village Library to provide needed access to computers and internet access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.

As part of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship COVID-19 Funding and Support program in collaboration with New Mexico State University’s computer science department, a one-year, $50,000 grant will provide both access to computers and critical online access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.

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“Less than half of our

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A cart is used to hold and organize school-owned laptops to be distributed to students at a Manhattan elementary school in March. | Getty Images

A cart is used to hold and organize laptops to be distributed to students at a Manhattan elementary school in March. | Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

The Legal Aid Society is threatening to sue the de Blasio administration for failing to provide internet access to homeless children in shelters, effectively blocking their ability to participate in remote learning during Covid-19.

Legal Aid and the law firm Milbank, representing the Coalition for the Homeless, sent a demand letter on Thursday to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza and Department of Homeless Services Administrator Joslyn Carter, calling on the city to remedy internet access problems at the Flatlands Family Residence in Brooklyn and other DHS facilities with school-age children.

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“In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, internet access is not a luxury; it is a basic prerequisite to entering the ‘virtual classroom’ that has been necessitated by the virus,” the letter, shared with POLITICO, said.

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Guillermo Eleazar

Lt. Gen. Guillermo Eleazar. (Photo from his Facebook account)

MANILA, Philippines — The government will discuss a proposal to allow poor students avail the services of computer and internet shops for their online classes, the Joint Task Force (JTF) COVID Shield revealed on Wednesday.

In a statement, JTF COVID Shield chief Police Lt. Gen. Guillermo Eleazar said the task force issued the proposal as most of the local government units (LGUs) are lacking funds to procure gadgets and provide them to thousands of students for distance learning.

“We feel and understand the concerns of both the students and the parents, especially the poor, in this new kind of learning method. That is why the national government, through the NTF (National Task Force) on COVID-19 and the IATF (Inter-Agency Task Force on Emerging Infectious Diseases) are really finding ways to extend all the necessary assistance to them,” Elezar, who is also

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LIGAO CITY—Four persons, three of whom were students taking online classes, were injured after a ten-wheel truck rammed on Tuesday (Oct. 6) the computer shop where they were in along the Maharlika Highway in this city, a police report said.

The injured were identified as Nikko Oriel, 14 years old and a Grade 9 student; Ralf Marcos Quiped, 12 years old and a Grade 6 student; Justine Dela Cruz, 15, a junior high school student and Marion Manga, 27, computer shop owner, according to SSgt. Joel Llmas, Ligao City police investigator.

Llamas said an Isuzu flatbed truck from Guinobatan town was on the national road at the village of Tuburan past noon when it careened off its track and slammed into the computer shop where the students and shop owner were in.

The truck was being driven by Severo Sadia, of Naga City, and on board was the driver’s companion,

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Since COVID-19 first shut down in-person learning, Seattle Public Schools (SPS) has distributed devices and internet for thousands of students. But for months, district officials haven’t be able to answer these questions with certainty:

How many kids actually need the technology? And does it work well enough to meet remote learning demands?

They’re questions central to conducting school online and closing digital access and learning gaps, especially for Seattle, whose schools appear to be staying remote for the foreseeable future.

But after school buildings closed last spring, Seattle and other districts didn’t take complete stock of how many students needed devices and internet, instead relying on student poverty rates and drawing estimates from surveys. As a result, data on technology access for students during the pandemic has been spotty.

About 4,000 of SPS’ over 50,000 students haven’t been engaging regularly with online learning this fall, half of whom the district

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Even as campus remains closed to visitors amid the pandemic, tens of thousands of high school students around the world are getting an inside view of the student experience directly from Yale undergraduates.

Since April, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions has been offering daily hour-long virtual information sessions with admissions officers and current students, as well as informal virtual student forums that give participants direct, real-time access to Yale students. 

Given the turmoil of the pandemic, the admissions office initially expected summer registrations for the new virtual events to fall short of the more than 20,000 visitors who attended on-campus events in summer 2019. But the opposite has been true: total registrations were up nearly 40%. 

Virtual events really make our reach global,” said Debra Johns, associate director of admissions, who coordinates the office’s visitor programming. “In a single virtual session in June, we had prospective students participating from

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Non-profit organisation Code for Change is offering high school students the opportunity to get experience with front-end web development and coding. 

The free-to-use training platform works using CodeJIKA programme. It has been used in over 250 schools since its launch in 2017. 

“Our goal is to build a vibrant eco-system of student-run coding clubs in secondary schools throughout Africa,” said the company on its website. 

Code for Change has major investment from key partners including Google, HKLM and Adobe which all make offering this key skill feature easier. 

South Africa’s education is attempting to reform to meet new world standards which include students learning to code earlier in their schooling career. 

Currently, many only find out about computer science once they’re at university which is considered quite late to pick up these skills. 

CodeJIKA teaches foundational coding, web development, and computer science skills, specifically with schools and communities that are

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