Tag Archive : Years

/ Years

  • One of the biggest changes to the iPhone lineup this year deals with its segmentation and pricing.
  • Apple changed its iPhone lineup so that the entry-level new model advertised at $699 is now a Mini device with a smaller screen. The regular iPhone 12 costs $799, $100 more than the iPhone 11 did when it came out.
  • If the iPhone 12 becomes the most popular of Apple’s current models, as is likely, the increase could boost the average iPhone selling price, a key metric for Apple investors.



Tim Cook holding a sign: Apple CEO Tim Cook reveals the new iPhone 12.


© Provided by CNBC
Apple CEO Tim Cook reveals the new iPhone 12.

Apple announced new iPhones Tuesday in a video presentation just over an hour long covering the new devices’ faster chips, 5G speeds and capabilities, and improved cameras.

But one of the most important pieces of information for investors and customers got significantly less stage time: Changes to the iPhone lineup’s

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Posted: Oct 13, 2020 10:00 AM

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Back in 2017, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released its Restoring Internet Freedom Order (RIFO) which provided “a framework for protecting an open internet while paving the way for better, faster, and cheaper internet access for all consumers.” Shortly after the proposals were approved, CNN famously proclaimed the decision was the “end of the internet as we know it.” John Oliver’s segment on Last Week Tonight covering RIFO led 150,000 Americans to file comments opposing the new rules.

The previous rules, which were imposed just two years before, required internet services to be treated in the same regulatory manner as a 1930s-style public utilities (referred to as Title II regulations) and required Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to “treat all internet traffic the same.” Classifying ISPs

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The team of Doug Clinton and Steve Van Sloun at Loup Ventures made a bullish case for Unity Software (NYSE: U), a company in which they have owned a stake since before the IPO in a blog post. 



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“Unity is on the road to becoming the next great creative software company,” Clinton and Van Sloun said. 

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Unity offers three major elements for a long-term thesis, the tech venture capitalists said: gaming as a social network, physical and virtual worlds merging and the growth of augmented and virtual reality.

Loup Ventures compared Unity to Adobe Inc (NASDAQ: ADBE) and Autodesk Inc (NASDAQ: ADSK), two publicly traded creative software companies.

Adobe, Autodesk Parallels: Loup Ventures notes that many of Unity’s customers are also using Adobe Creative Cloud and Autodesk products like AutoCAD, Revit and Maya.

Loup Ventures believes Unity has a shot at hitting the market

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(Cross posted from Signal360)

In a sweeping talk at the Association of National Advertisers conference last month, P&G Chief Brand Officer (and ANA Chair) Marc Pritchard laid out a five-step plan to address systemic problems in the marketing and media industries. Each step addresses serious challenges and opportunities — in diversity, inequality, and creative and business practices. But perhaps no step is more challenging — and crucial — than Pritchard’s Step Four: Eliminating all harmful content online. 

“There is still too much harmful, hateful, denigrating, and discriminatory content and commentary in too many digital sites, channels, and feeds,” Pritchard said. “There is no place for this type of content.”

While nearly everyone agrees with the idea of eliminating harmful content, key actors across the digital media industry seem paralyzed when it comes to how best to take action on the problem. What’s really going on? To understand, we must dive

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  • Facebook announced Monday it was changing its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”
  • The company has faced criticism for more than a decade over its refusal to moderate anti-Semitic content that distorts or denies the Holocaust, when Nazis and their allies systematically killed 6 million Jews, happened.
  • In the weeks leading up to the 2020 presidential election, Facebook has attempted to mitigate criticism that it fails to prevent the spread of dangerous conspiracy theories and disinformation on its platform. Just last week, Facebook said it banned QAnon accounts across its platforms.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook has banned Holocaust-denial content from the platform after years of criticism over its refusal to take action against such anti-Semitic rhetoric.

Facebook announced Monday it was updating its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”

The policy change

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Getting Internet Identity Right, 30 Years On

October 9, 2020 | internet | No Comments

This week, Michael Casey and Sheila Warren talk to Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf about the future of identity on the internet.

A developer whose three-decade career has seen him deeply involved in efforts to foster a more open internet, Brian grasps, like few others, the nuances of how human beings should live within a rapidly changing digital economy.

Getting Internet Identity Right, 30 Years On

We tend to think of governments, with the data they collect on births, drivers licenses, tax returns and passports, as humanity’s primary identity managers. 

Arguably, internet platforms have usurped that role. Some store more identifying records than China – Facebook has 2.7 billion active users; Google manages 1.5 billion email accounts. Just as important, they can tie those records to our online behavior and gather immense predictive power. Facebook’s algorithm even knows if you are going to break up with your partner – before

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Where Will Amazon Be In 10 Years?

October 9, 2020 | technology | No Comments

Few companies have experienced greater long-term success than Amazon. It was a darling of the dot-com boom, but its shares briefly fell into the single digits after the tech bubble burst.

However, over time, Amazon orchestrated a recovery as it dramatically increased its merchandise selection and made an early move into cloud computing. These shifts helped to make Amazon one of the largest public companies in the world. Consequently, its market cap has grown to about $1.6 trillion, and its current share price of about $3,200 per share is a far cry from its low point in the dot-com bust.

Indeed, this retail stock has a history of defying its naysayers. While it’s difficult to accurately predict the state of Amazon in 2030, its financials and continuing growth in cloud computing bode well for the company’s future.

Amazon’s financials

With the company firing on all cylinders, Amazon appears to remain

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Steve Ballmer. (GeekWire File Photo / Dan DeLong)

Twenty years after Microsoft waged its own antitrust battle with the U.S. government, former CEO Steve Ballmer is betting that Congress won’t break up Big Tech this time around.

In an interview with CNBC on Wednesday (below), Ballmer was reacting to a U.S. House antitrust subcommittee report released this week that found challenges presented by the dominance and business practices of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

RELATED: House antitrust probe says Amazon has ‘monopoly power’ over sellers, company slams ‘fringe’ findings

“I’ll bet money that they will not be broken up,” Ballmer told CNBC.

The 450-page report from the subcommittee’s Democratic leaders concludes a 16-month investigation into the four companies as the operators of major online markets. It finds that the market power of the tech giants “has diminished consumer choice, eroded innovation and entrepreneurship in the U.S. economy, weakened the vibrancy

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a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com


© vaalaa/Shutterstock.com
Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com

  • Even if a coronavirus vaccine is approved soon, it will likely be years until it can be distributed around the world, according to cargo airline and logistics executives.
  • Challenging storage and shipping requirements, combined with reduced cargo availability and higher demand, are likely to delay distribution, according to a new Wall Street Journal report.
  • Although cargo airlines are trying to prepare, a host of unknowns — including where the vaccine will be made, how many doses are needed, and how it will need to be stored — means there’s only so much that can be organized in advance.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even if a COVID-19 vaccine can be developed, approved, and mass produced quickly, getting it to countries and communities around the world

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a woman standing in front of a building


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  • The woman agreed to pay $ 3.8 million in restitution, a sum equivalent to the total sent by buyers to her four PayPal accounts over the 19 years she was offended.

Kim Richardson, a resident of Dallas, Texas, was sentenced to 54 months in federal prison and three years in a row of supervised release for being part of an interstate theft network of merchandise sold on eBay and through Internet direct sales.

Richardson, 63, also agreed to pay $ 3.8 million in restitution, a sum equal to the total sent by buyers to his four PayPal accounts over the 19 years he was delinquent.



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The woman pleaded guilty in December 2019 and admitted that she participated in a conspiracy, which lasted from August 2000 to April 2019. During that period, Richardson periodically traveled the United States stealing items from numerous

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