Month: October 2020

Home / Month: October 2020

The second and final day of Prime Day 2020 is here, but there are still a ton of deals to take advantage of for the next several hours, including this fantastic deal on Sony’s new WH-1000XM4 wireless over-ear headphones. Normally, these headphones cost $350, but if you are an Amazon Prime member, you can buy a pair for just $298. Even better? Amazon will also give you a $25 gift card to its website when you purchase these headphones. Best Buy and B&H Photo are also price matching Amazon, but unfortunately, neither retailer is including the gift card sweetener like Amazon. The price is available for both color options (black and silver).

Sony originally released these headphones in August. When stacked up against its predecessor, the WH-1000XM3, the newer model shares a similar design but allows users the ability to pair two devices via Bluetooth simultaneously. My colleague, Chris Welch,

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The company formerly known as NewsCred has a new name and a new product: Welcome.

Co-founder and CEO Shafqat Islam explained that this follows a broader shift in the company’s strategy. While previously known as a content marketing business, Islam said NewsCred has been increasingly focused on building a broader software platform for marketers (a platform that it uses itself).

Eventually, this led the company to sell its content services business to business journalism company Industry Dive and its owner Falfurrias Capital Partners over the summer. Now Welcome is officially unveiling its new brand, which it’s also using for its new marketing orchestration software.

“It’s not often not often that startups like ours get to close one chapter and open another chapter,” Islam said. “We kind of went back to being a Series A, Series B startup, iterating and working very closely with our customers.”

While today is the official

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The U.S. Army has just put more than a billion dollars into a new air defense system called IM-SHORAD to protect soldiers from drone attacks. It is a vital mission – but the last time the Army tried to develop something like this the project failed horribly. And even if the new system works as intended, serious questions remain.

The U.S. has enjoyed air superiority, if not air supremacy, in every conflict for decades. American planes have swept the enemy aircraft from the sky or destroyed them on the ground. The last time an American soldier was killed by enemy air attack was during the Korean War. As a result, while the Russians and others have continued to develop generations of armored vehicles carrying surface-to-air missiles

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CEO of Rookout. Has led data-driven businesses, products and R&D teams over the last two decades, from startups to government organizations.

Cloud. Microservices. Containers. Serverless.

These are buzzwords everyone in the software industry has become familiar with. That’s not even getting into the world of “machine learning” and “AIOps” (artificial intelligence operations). While it’s true that many cutting-edge companies, particularly in the tech industry, are embracing and adopting modern software architectures and methodologies, the fact is that the large majority of companies are running legacy applications responsible for millions, if not billions, of dollars in revenue.

The pandemic has shown just how much we rely on these aging legacy IT systems. According to a recent report from AppDynamics, 66% of IT professionals say that “the pandemic has exposed weaknesses in their digital strategy, driving an urgent need to push through initiatives which were once a part of multiyear

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Governments around the world have seized on the coronavirus crisis as an opportunity to expand digital surveillance and harvest more data on their citizens, according to a report out Wednesday from Freedom House, a democracy and human rights research group.

Why it matters: Privacy advocates have warned since early in the pandemic that the tech behind efforts to conduct contact tracing and enforce quarantines and other public safety protocols could be abused and made permanent, particularly in authoritarian countries like China.

What’s happening, according to the report:

Dozens of countries have rolled out government-backed contact-tracing apps without effective laws to protect people from overly expansive data collection.

  • China, Russia, India, Singapore, Ecuador and Bahrain were among the countries that Freedom House found implemented apps that either send reams of data unchecked to government servers or make invasive data and health documentation demands.

Governments in at least 28 countries censored

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Just Eat Takeaway.com said on Wednesday that orders in Canada — where it operates as Skip The Dishes — rose by 98% to 23.5 million in the third quarter compared with the same period last year.

Canadians have been used to picking up food from restaurants rather than having it delivered to their homes. But that appears to be changing, encouraged by restrictions imposed during the pandemic and lockdowns that kept people at home.

“We are now transforming that pick-up culture into a delivery culture, that’s why it’s growing so quickly,” Just Eat Takeaway.com’s investor relations manager Joris Wilton told CNN Business, adding that the second quarter had seen similar levels of growth.

A big increase in the selection of meals offered by restaurants also helped, making consumers more likely to order food more often, he said.

Just Eat Takeaway.com, which was formed through a high-stakes merger last year, is
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Activating validation services for route origin, TWNIC continues to safeguard Internet routing security with RPKI

People are growingly reliant on the Internet for work, school and daily activities. The impact to people’s life will be unthinkable should the Internet suddenly stop working. Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is one of the key elements that allow the Internet to maintain smooth operation. BGP hijacking, whether as a result of intentional attack by hackers or unintentional configuration errors, causes disruption to Internet services and even threats to information security. There can be serious consequences, so every government agency, private corporation and individual are obligated to prevent this from happening.

The Taiwan Network Information Center (TWNIC) has been actively promoting Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI) with an aim to enhance Internet routing security since the official signing of TWNIC RPKI Certificate Authority (CA) with the Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC) on September 28,

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  • While the polls suggest a blue wave victory is in reach for Democrats this November, the stock market isn’t so sure, according to a note from Evercore ISI.
  • Wall Street strategists have been forecasting that a blue wave would likely be positive for stocks on hopes of a large stimulus deal shortly after the election, which would help spur a surge in value and cyclical stocks.
  • But this week’s rotation out of value and into tech suggests that chances of a blue wave in November are less likely, according to the note.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Wall Street is increasingly expecting a blue wave victory for Democrats this November after the polls close, which would likely lead to the reflation trade: a surge in cyclical and value stocks at the expense of technology and growth stocks.

But recent trading activity in the stock market suggests

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Internet freedom has declined for the 10th consecutive year as governments around the world are using the coronavirus pandemic as a “cover” to expand online surveillance, crack down on dissent, and build new technological systems to control society, Freedom House says in a new report.

The Washington-based human rights watchdog’s annual Freedom Of The Net report, released on October 14, said the authorities in dozens of countries have cited COVID-19 “to justify expanded surveillance powers and the deployment of new technologies that were once seen as too intrusive.”

As a result, Internet freedom has worsened in 26 of the 65 countries covered by the report, while only 22 registered gains.

And just 20 percent of the estimated 3.8 billion people using the Internet live in countries with a free Internet, according to the democracy research group.

Myanmar, Kyrgyzstan, India, Ecuador, and Nigeria suffered the largest declines during the coverage period

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