Tag Archive : antitrust

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(Bloomberg) — Google is confronting a growing backlash against its market power in international markets, compounding the company’s regulatory challenges as it girds for an historic antitrust suit from the U.S. Justice Dept.

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In just a matter of weeks, the search giant’s business practices have drawn scrutiny in Australia, South Korea and India. The European Union’s antitrust chief has already threatened to break up Google if it won’t change its ways, while the company pulled out of China a decade ago because of government censorship.

India is a prime example of how Google’s troubles could undercut future growth. More than 200 startup founders have banded together and opened discussions with the government to stop the Alphabet Inc. unit from imposing a 30% fee on smartphone app purchases, its standard levy around the world. While Google delayed implementation for six months after an outcry last week, the country’s tech

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Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the TechCrunch series that recaps the latest OS news, the applications they support and the money that flows through it all.

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The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 204 billion downloads and $120 billion in consumer spending in 2019. People are now spending three hours and 40 minutes per day using apps, rivaling TV. Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours — they’re a big business. In 2019, mobile-first companies had a combined $544 billion valuation, 6.5x higher than those without a mobile focus.

In this series, we help you keep up with the latest news from the world of apps, delivered on a weekly basis.

Apple declared monopoly by U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust

Apple was one of the four big tech companies the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust declared as having enjoyed

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Here’s what we’re talking about on the GeekWire Podcast this week:



a drawing of a face: GeekWire Podcast: Amazon antitrust findings; Satya Nadella’s WFH tips; Mysterious $60B woman


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GeekWire Podcast: Amazon antitrust findings; Satya Nadella’s WFH tips; Mysterious $60B woman

A long-awaited report from a U.S. House antitrust subcommittee landed this week, and it slammed Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple for their alleged monopolistic practices in the online marketplaces they operate. Amazon responded with a scathing blog post that said the report featured “flawed thinking.”

Lots of tech people are working from home due to the pandemic, and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has some tips on how to do it and maintain your health and well-being. Schedule some short meetings, he says, and don’t forget your transition times.

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A new story from the Medium business publication Marker paints an extraordinary portrait of the life of one of the richest women in the world, MacKenzie Scott, which is all the more

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Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Britain’s top antitrust enforcer laid out plans for a new regulator, saying the largest tech companies would face scrutiny for any transaction, no matter how small.

Andrea Coscelli, who leads the Competition and Markets Authority, said he wanted to see a “special parallel regime” for the tech giants that have strategic market status. The new program could also apply a stricter test before clearing any deal, Coscelli said in a speech delivered remotely to a New York conference.

The CMA is increasingly voicing concerns about internet giants swallowing up smaller firms and the new system would automatically have oversight of deals like Facebook Inc.’s purchase of Giphy. The renewed effort to roll back the dominance of these companies comes as the U.K.’s departure from the European Union gives the CMA leeway to devise new approaches to antitrust.

“For me, the case for regulation is

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This week, the US House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee published its final report as part of a 15-month inquiry into antitrust concerns in Big Tech – Amazon being one of the four companies under investigation. 

Many brands who have 1st party (“1P”) relationships with Amazon are currently entering their Annual Vendor Negotiations right now. This process is high stakes as it dictates the profit margins, available product assortment, and marketing budget for the upcoming year. Similarly, third party sellers – referred to as ‘partners’ in Amazon marketing materials but as ‘competitors’ behind closed doors – experience their own challenges. 

The report from the Subcommittee vindicates many brands who have felt a power imbalance at play in their relationship with the retail giant. Congress has spoken: you’re not alone, and this is not fair. Here are some of the themes from Tuesday’s report that are relevant to brands that sell products on

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Representative David Cicilline, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, said on Wednesday he would be “comfortable with unwinding” Facebook Inc’s acquisition of Instagram.

The antitrust subcommittee on Tuesday released a report on Big Tech’s abuses of market power but stopped short of naming specific companies or acquisitions that must be broken up.

Cicilline, a Democrat from Rhode Island, told Reuters in an interview that Facebook should not have been allowed to buy Instagram, a deal that the Federal Trade Commission approved in 2012.

“I would be comfortable with unwinding that. I think that’s the right answer,” he said.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment. It has said previously that Instagram was insignificant at the time it was purchased and that Facebook built it into the success it has become.

Any effort to unwind the deal would entail the government

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Steve Ballmer. (GeekWire File Photo / Dan DeLong)

Twenty years after Microsoft waged its own antitrust battle with the U.S. government, former CEO Steve Ballmer is betting that Congress won’t break up Big Tech this time around.

In an interview with CNBC on Wednesday (below), Ballmer was reacting to a U.S. House antitrust subcommittee report released this week that found challenges presented by the dominance and business practices of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

RELATED: House antitrust probe says Amazon has ‘monopoly power’ over sellers, company slams ‘fringe’ findings

“I’ll bet money that they will not be broken up,” Ballmer told CNBC.

The 450-page report from the subcommittee’s Democratic leaders concludes a 16-month investigation into the four companies as the operators of major online markets. It finds that the market power of the tech giants “has diminished consumer choice, eroded innovation and entrepreneurship in the U.S. economy, weakened the vibrancy

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Earlier today, the U.S. House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee completed its ongoing antitrust investigation into the practices of Apple, Facebook, Google, and Amazon, reaching the conclusion that the tech companies are the “kinds of monopolies” last seen in “the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons.”


Apple in a statement to MacRumors said that it strongly disagrees with the conclusions reached in the report in respect to Apple, and that Apple does not have dominant market share in categories where it does business.

We have always said that scrutiny is reasonable and appropriate but we vehemently disagree with the conclusions reached in this staff report with respect to Apple. Our company does not have a dominant market share in any category where we do business. From its beginnings 12 years ago with just 500 apps, we’ve built the App Store to be a safe and trusted place for users to discover

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Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) thinks antitrust regulation of Big Tech companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google is going to be tough, and in order to pass meaningful reforms that rein in the power of Big Tech companies, Congress will need the help of the American people. Cicilline is chair of the antitrust subcommittee in Congress and spoke Sunday as part of a Yale University School of Law conference about antitrust ahead of the anticipated release of what Cicilline calls the most extensive antitrust law reform investigation by Congress in more than 50 years.

Identifying anticompetitive behavior by big companies is pretty easy, he said, but developing solutions and gathering the necessary political support for reform is the challenge.

“We’re going to have to combat companies that have an enormous stake in maintaining the status quo, which has been enormously profitable for them, and so this will be a big

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