Tag Archive : chipmaker

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Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) is in late-stage talks geared toward acquiring rival processor giant Xilinx, reports suggest.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the discussion, now in “advanced” stages, could be valued at over $30 billion. 

The publication reported on Thursday that an agreement could be finalized as early as next week. 

However, sources close to the matter added that discussions had previously “stalled” before restarting, and so there is no concrete guarantee that an acquisition bid would be accepted or go ahead at all. 

See also: AMD unveils Ryzen 5000 processors, including ‘the world’s best gaming CPU’

Over this year, AMD has launched a variety of new processors including the AMD Radeon Pro 5000 gaming processors, Ryzen & Ryzen Pro 4000G, and the enterprise Epyc 7Fx2 series. 

The company has enjoyed a surge in share price over the past 12 months, rising from roughly $28 in October 2019 to

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(Bloomberg) — Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is in advanced discussions to buy Xilinx Inc. in a takeover that could be valued at $30 billion, according to people familiar with the matter.

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The deal could come together as early as next week, though things remain in flux, the people said, asking not to be identified discussing a private deal. The Wall Street Journal first reported on the negotiations.

A combination with Xilinx would give AMD Chief Executive Officer Lisa Su more of the pieces needed to break Intel Corp.’s stranglehold on the profitable market for data-center computer components. It would follow moves by rival Nvidia Corp., which bought Mellanox Technologies Ltd. and aims to use its pending acquisition of Arm Ltd. to grab more of that business.

Acquiring Xilinx, which makes programmable chips for wireless networks, would also help AMD expand into a new market just as telecommunications carriers

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Shares in SMIC, China’s biggest chipmaker, fell on Monday on fears that it could lose access to key US technology.



a group of people standing in front of a building: People visit the stand of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) during an exhibition in Shanghai, China, 14 March 2018. (Imaginechina via AP Images)


© Imaginechina via AP Images
People visit the stand of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) during an exhibition in Shanghai, China, 14 March 2018. (Imaginechina via AP Images)

The Financial Times reported this weekend that the US Commerce Department has sent a letter to companies warning of an “unacceptable risk” that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation could be used for military purposes.

It’s not entirely clear whether that letter means that official restrictions on SMIC have gone into effect. The FT reported that the firm had been “hit by US sanctions.” Reuters similarly reported that the US is tightening controls on exports to SMIC, citing the letter.

But the US Commerce Department has not yet added the Chinese firm to its Entity List, which would require US companies

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Kioxia had planned to list on the Tokyo Stock Exchange on 6 October. Photo: Getty
Kioxia had planned to list on the Tokyo Stock Exchange on 6 October. Photo: Getty

The world’s second-largest maker of NAND flash memory chips, Kioxia is considering delaying Japan’s biggest initial public offering (IPO) as tensions between the United States and China ramp up.

Earlier this month, the company which spun out of Toshiba Corp (TOSBF) in 2018, set a tentative price range for an IPO in Tokyo to raise as much as $2.9bn (£2.3bn).

Toshiba has retained roughly 40% of Xioxia, with the rest held by a group of Japanese, US and South Korean investors.

The Japanese chipmaker was due to reveal its final pricing on Monday, instead Xioxia’s board is reportedly meeting on Monday to discuss its options, according to the Financial Times.

Kioxia had planned to list on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (JPXGY) on 6 October, at a valuation of more than $14bn. The company warned tighter

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US wariness of Chinese tech firms was underlined again Friday, when the Commerce Department sent a letter to companies in the states reportedly telling them they must get a license before exporting certain goods to China’s largest chipmaker, because of concerns about military use of technology.



a traffic light hanging off the side of a building: The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images


© Provided by CNET
The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images

The Commerce Department said in the letter that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation “may pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China,” according to a Saturday report by The New York Times.

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Last year, the US placed restrictions on companies selling gear to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei , over concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.

And popular video app TikTok,

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The US Commerce Department has added China’s largest chipmaker, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC), to its entity list, after it determined there an “unacceptable risk” that equipment SMIC received could be used for military purposes, Reuters reported.

The move blocks US computer chip companies from exporting technology to SMIC without an export license. SMIC is the latest major Chinese firm to be put on the entity list; the Trump administration added phone manufacturer Huawei to the list in 2019.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the Commerce Department wrote in a letter to the computer chip industry on Friday that exporting products to SMIC would “pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China.”

In April, the administration tightened export rules on shipping goods to China. It claims it’s seeking to keep US companies from selling products that could be used

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The Department didn’t directly comment on SMIC, but told Reuters it was “constantly monitoring and assessing” possible threats to US security and foreign policy.

SMIC, meanwhile, appeared to have been caught by surprise. A spokesperson said the chip giant hadn’t received any official word of restrictions and reiterated denials of any military link. The company offers chips and services “solely for civilian and commercial end-users and end-uses,” according to the representative.

The semiconductor producer is just the second top-tier company added to the entity list after Huawei. While the effect of the ban won’t be clear until the Commerce Department decides who (if anyone) gets a license, it could represent a significant blow to Chinese tech as a whole. SMIC may have to turn to non-US technology whenever it wants to upgrade its manufacturing or maintain hardware, and there’s no guarantee it will find what it needs. It could find

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