Tag Archive : Copyright

/ Copyright

(Reuters) — The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in

Read More

KEY POINTS

  • Oral arguments were held before the Supreme Court over the copyright case between Oracle and Google
  • Google stands to pay Oracle nearly $9 billion for 11,000 lines of code in Android software if the court rules in Oracle’s favor
  • Big tech is throwing in behind Google while media and entertainment companies and the Trump administration is backing Oracle

The Supreme Court faces upending the tech industry by determining whether Google stole code from Oracle in building its Android operating system in a case that could redefine the meaning of the fair use doctrine. All eight justices on Wednesday grilled the tech giants’ legal teams as well the U.S. deputy solicitor general in a potentially far-reaching case.

Google said its incorporation of 11,500 lines of Oracle Java code constitutes fair use, while Oracle argued the action violated its ownership rights. The lawsuit has been working its way through the

Read More

US Supreme Court justices peppered lawyers for Google and Oracle with questions on computer code and copyright Wednesday in a court clash which could have major ramifications for the technology sector and digital innovation.

Oral arguments were heard in a decade-old legal battle between the two Silicon Valley giants stemming from Oracle’s claim that Google illegally copied parts of the Java programming language to develop its Android mobile operating system.

The case revolves around whether copyright protection should be extended to application software interfaces (APIs), or bit of code that allow programs and apps to work together, and if so, whether Google’s implementation was a “fair use” of copyrighted material.

In the court session held remotely, Google attorney Thomas Goldstein argued that the practice of reusing software interfaces “is critical to modern interoperable computer software” and allows developers “to write millions of creative applications that are used by more than

Read More

google-hq-sede-mountain-view.jpg

The Supreme Court building in Washington, DC.


Getty Images

Google and Oracle faced off Wednesday before the US Supreme Court in a multibillion dollar battle that could have a major effect on how companies develop software in the future. 

The two tech giants are clashing over the architecture of Google’s Android operating system, the dominant mobile software on the planet. At the center of the fight is a question of copyright protections for application programming interfaces, or APIs, which govern how code communicates with other bits of code. 

Android was built in part by using APIs from Java, which was developed by Sun Microsystems. Oracle bought Sun in 2010 and later sued Google for allegedly illegal use of the software. The settlement could be worth almost $9 billion

For Google, the investment

Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tech giants Google and Oracle are clashing at the Supreme Court in a copyright dispute that’s worth billions and important to the future of software development.

The case before the justices Wednesday has to do with Google’s creation of the Android operating system now used on the vast majority of smartphones worldwide. Google says that to create Android, which was released in 2007, it wrote millions of lines of new computer code. But it also used 11,330 lines of code and an organization that’s part of Oracle’s Java platform.

Google has defended its actions, saying what it did is long-settled, common practice in the industry, a practice that has been good for technical progress. But Oracle says Google “committed an egregious act of plagiarism” and sued, seeking more than $8 billion.

The case has been going on for a decade. Google won the first round when a

Read More

As a Premium Partner of the Book Fair, CCC Continues to Spotlight Innovation in Global Publishing

Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a leader in advancing copyright, accelerating knowledge, and powering innovation, has once again partnered with The Frankfurt Book Fair to spotlight innovation in global publishing.

“As the Frankfurt Book Fair is virtual this year, we are adapting our programming to resonate with audiences worldwide, celebrating the innovative solutions being developed by the publishing industry,” said Michael Healy, Executive Director, International Relations, CCC. “We look forward to engaging in valuable discussions on key issues and fully supporting the Book Fair’s 2020 motto – Signals of Hope: New Perspectives for a Stronger Future.”

As part of its partnership with the Book Fair, CCC will host interactive panel discussions and presentations by industry experts, including:

COVID-19, Copyright and the Creative Economy
Tuesday, 13 October, 11:00am – 11:30am, EDT, 17:00 CEST

The global

Read More

As the multi-billion dollar software industry continues to become more and more financially lucrative, some of the more unethical entrepreneurs in America are attempting to get in on the moneymaking action by distributing pirated software. Often carried out online, software piracy can cost the industry millions of dollars in lost revenue, and the offense can carry hefty punitive fines and prison sentences.

According to reports from the United States Department of Justice Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (http://www.cybercrime.gov/), Operation FastLink, a federal program called “the largest global enforcement action ever undertaken against online piracy,” since 2004 has been responsible for confiscating over $50 million worth of pirated media from distributors. Additionally, the USDJ’s Intellectual Property Task Force recently released its 2006 progress report, highlighting the achievements of the organization in exceeding the goals put forth in its 2004 report. The federal government is taking decisive steps to combat software … Read More