Tag Archive : Coronavirus

/ Coronavirus

It’s rare when a company returns federal money. It’s rarer still when that money amounts to billions of dollars. Yet that’s the situation with top U.S. hospital operator HCA Healthcare (NYSE:HCA), which aims to return gobs of government largesse from whence it came.

All told, HCA announced that it’s planning to return roughly $6 billion, $1.6 billion of which consists of federal COVID-19 grants and $4.4 billion in Medicare loans. Both were provided as part of the government’s Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) passed in the early stages of the current pandemic.

HCA benefited from the loans and grants bestowed upon operators of healthcare facilities to help keep them afloat.

The company will pay those funds back because it continues to thrive, even though many elective surgeries have been postponed or canceled in the face of the coronavirus.

Last week HCA published a “preview” of its Q3

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US President Trump has become subject to another fact-check warning on social media after claiming immunity to COVID-19.

In a tweet posted on Sunday, the US president claimed that physicians at the White House have given him a clean bill of health, and as a result, he is now “immune” to further infection by the novel coronavirus. 

Trump also claimed he is no longer contagious. 

See also: Twitter places public interest notice on President Trump’s tweet

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday,” the tweet reads. “That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!”

After the message was published, Twitter slapped a warning label on the tweet. The microblogging platform says the tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.”

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There are currently no concrete indicators that immunity from COVID-19 is

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  • Since the start of the pandemic, dating apps have seen a spike in usage.
  • But users also have new concerns that these apps have to address. 
  • Business Insider spoke with the founder and CEO of Hinge, Justin McLeod, on how coronavirus has changed the face of dating for good and what the company is doing about it. 
  • Hinge is taking steps like launching a partnership with mental health space Headspace and pushing for more video-based dates – which could stay popular even after it’s safe to meet in person. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The way people meet and date has changed dramatically since the onset of the pandemic, and dating apps like Hinge are trying to keep up with the shift. 

People are going on more dates than ever before, but they’re not meeting up as frequently, Justin McLeod, founder and CEO of the dating app Hinge,

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sars cov 2 on a spreadsheet

Getty/Photo Illustration by PM

  • The United Kingdom mistakenly lost about 16,000 COVID-19 (coronavirus) test results, leading to inaccurate case figures in England.
  • Officials with Public Health England, the agency tasked with tallying the positive cases, says the snafu stems from technical issue.
  • Microsoft Excel limits files to just over one million rows, so any excess records are cut off—in this case, thousands of test results.

    Between September 25 and October 2, the United Kingdom inadvertently omitted nearly 16,000 COVID-19 records in an official database, leading to drastically inaccurate case numbers in England.

    The culprit, according to Public Health England (PHE)—a government body of the U.K.’s Department of Health and Social Care, which collates data from public and private labs—wasn’t human, but rather … Microsoft Excel.

    DIVE DEEPER ➡ Read best-in-class science and tech features and get unlimited access to Pop Mech, starting NOW.

    “A technical issue was identified overnight

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    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged Monday that people can sometimes be infected with the coronavirus through airborne transmission, especially in enclosed spaces with inadequate ventilation.

    The long-awaited update to the agency web page explaining how the virus spreads represents an official acknowledgment of growing evidence that under certain conditions, people farther than six feet apart can become infected by tiny droplets and particles that float in the air for minutes and hours, and that they play a role in the pandemic.

    The update follows an embarrassing incident last month when the agency removed a draft that had not gone through proper review and was posted in error. The draft’s wording included a reference to aerosols – tiny droplets that can stay in the air, potentially traveling a significant distance. Officials said the draft was removed because they feared the language could be misinterpreted as suggesting that airborne

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    The glitch was no mere rounding error in the government’s accounting, but another serious stumble at a crucial moment, when the British government is daily trying to decide where to tighten regional lockdowns to slow a second wave of the virus.

    After the error was spotted and the lost cases accounted for, the government’s report of new daily infections nearly doubled — from 12,872 on Saturday to 22,961 on Sunday — sparking renewed angst among officials in London and England’s north, where most of the new cases were centered.

    Michael Brodie, the interim head of Public Health England, said the issue was identified late Friday in the computer process that communicates positive results from labs to the country’s reporting dashboards. Some data files containing positive results had exceeded the maximum file size, he said, according to the BBC.

    “We fully understand the concern this may cause,” Brodie added, “and further

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    Britain reported a surge in daily COVID-19 cases to a record 22,961 on Sunday after authorities admitted a technical issue had meant that over 15,000 test results had not been transferred into computer systems on time, including for contact tracers. The technical problem, which was identified on Friday and has now been resolved, led to 15,841 cases not being uploaded into reporting dashboards used by the NHS contact-tracing system.

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock is due to give a statement in the Commons later today to explain the blunder amid reports the missing results exceeded the maximum file size.

    Political commentator Andrew Neil described the new as a “government shambles”.

    News of the glitch was likely to cast further doubt over the robustness of the national test-and-trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson said would be “world-beating” but which has experienced a series of delays and setbacks.

    In terms of tracing

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    The total number of Covid-19 cases recorded in the UK since the start of the pandemic has exceeded 500,000, with official figures for the number of patients in hospital beginning to rise as the number of cases also increase around the country.

    It comes as Boris Johnson warned the nation that the Covid-19 crisis will remain “bumpy until Christmas and possibly beyond” on Sunday.

    Here is your daily roundup of coronavirus news you may have missed overnight.

    An “artificially high” new daily record of almost 23,000 new Covid-19 cases were recorded in the UK on Sunday night due to a computer glitch, said the government.

    Public Health England said its official Covid dashboard failed to count more than 15,000 positive results reported between 25 September and 2 October, and added it to the figures for the weekend, resulting in record rises of 12,872 on Saturday and 22,961 on Sunday.

    The

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    Nearly 16,000 Coronavirus Cases Were Missed From The UK's Tally After A Computer Glitch

    The blunder has hampered efforts to contact those who may have been exposed to the virus


    3 min read

    A “technical glitch” in England’s test and trace system has resulted in major delays in handing over the details of almost 16,000 positive cases to contact tracers.

    Public Health England said 15,841 positive tests carried out between 25 September and 2 October had been added to the UK’s daily case totals over the weekend after a computer glitch meant they were not recorded on time.

    The blunder saw the UK’s positive case figures soar after the backlog was finally added to the official tally, with 12,872 cases recorded on Saturday and a further 22,961 on Sunday.

    PHE insisted all those who had been tested during the period had recieved their results as normal, with those testing positive for the virus being asked to self-isolate.

    But

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    As our new era of U.S.-Chinese major power competition accelerates, this week’s train wreck of an American presidential debate, followed more dramatically on Friday by President Trump’s positive Covid test and hospitalization, contribute both to the perception and reality of Beijing’s historic gains.

    Chinese officials are unlikely to use this moment of unanticipated U.S. distraction for any sort of dramatic move that might provoke Washington, such as a military move on Taiwan’s independence to complement its recent actions to more fully control Hong Kong.

    At a minimum, however, Chinese officials will embrace this period as additional, welcome “breathing space” to escalate their ongoing efforts across a range of fronts to build upon their momentum – from tightening party control on the Chinese private sector, to the accelerated development of a digital currency, to closing remaining technology gaps with the United States.  

    Recent events have also contributed to Chinese confidence that

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