Tag Archive : Court

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Tax Court Will Go Dark For December

October 13, 2020 | technology | No Comments

I just picked up on an extraordinary piece of news that has been around for nearly a week with little notice. The Tax Court will be launching a new case management system called DAWSON (Docket Access Within a Secure Online Network). This is a nod of respect to the late Judge Howard Dawson who served the court for over fifty years before passing away in 2016. That is not the extraordinary part.

The Dark Month Of December

What is extraordinary is that the Tax Court’s existing system will shut down before Thanksgiving and DAWSON will not come on till after Christmas. Nothing new electronic goes in after 5:00PM on November 20th and it is expected that DAWSON will be up on December 28th. But there is more.

Here is the most extraordinary thing. During the hiatus the Tax Court will

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Run by Russian-speaking criminals, the botnet poses a “theoretical but real” threat to election integrity by launching ransomware attacks, in which data is rendered inaccessible unless the victim pays a ransom, said Tom Burt, Microsoft’s vice president of customer security and trust.

Botnets are networks of computers secretly infected by malware that can be controlled remotely. They can be used to spread ransomware, as well as to send malicious spam email to unsuspecting recipients. Trickbot is malware that can steal financial and personal data, and drop other malicious software, such as ransomware, onto infected systems.

The fear isn’t that an attack could alter actual results, but rather that it could shake the confidence of voters, especially those already on edge from President Trump’s unfounded assaults on the integrity of mail-in ballots. “Having just a few precincts report that they got disrupted and locked up and people couldn’t vote or their

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Public unhappiness over the “inappropriate” Republican push to fill a vacant Supreme Court seat weeks before the elections may actually build broad support for significant reform of the institution, said former tech executive and presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

Speaking at an opening session of the NYC Media Lab Summit’s second day, Yang ranged widely over familiar policy issues such as the need for a “data dividend” for people whose personal information is used without compensation by tech firms, and how a California ballot measure this fall could encourage other states to impose similar laws on tech giants. He also said the pandemic lockdown built support for the concept of universal basic income.

Those are familiar topics for those who followed Yang’s unsuccessful but idea-filled run for the Democratic nomination, in which he proposed a string of reforms to government institutions and to rebalance

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Supreme Court considers software copyrights

October 10, 2020 | software | No Comments

A historic, multibillion-dollar lawsuit between Oracle and Google may come down to the jumbled attempts on Wednesday by eight Supreme Court justices to find an appropriate analogy to describe common computer code.



a large building: The U.S. Supreme Court stands on September 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. This week Seventh U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, will begin meeting with Senators as she seeks to be confirmed before the presidential election. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)


© Al Drago/Getty Images
The U.S. Supreme Court stands on September 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. This week Seventh U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court, will begin meeting with Senators as she seeks to be confirmed before the presidential election. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)

From grocery stores to restaurant menus to QWERTY keyboards, the nation’s most esteemed jurists applied metaphor after metaphor to try to understand whether Google’s decision a decade ago to re-use software initially created by Oracle-owned Sun Microsystems violated copyright law.

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The rapid-fire string of analogies, along with the wide range of justices’ questions, left the case’s fate in doubt. The outcome

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A federal judge denied a request from Epic Games to force Apple to reinstate Epic’s Fortnite game on the App Store while awaiting the results of an antitrust lawsuit.

U.S. District Court judge Yvonne Gonzales Rogers also ruled in favor of Epic, permanently granting a prior temporary order that stops Apple from retaliating against Epic by removing support for Epic’s Unreal Engine.

The antitrust lawsuit began August 13 when Epic announced a discount policy and direct payment mechanism for Fortnite that Apple and Google said violated their respective terms of service. Epic CEO Tim Sweeney has long argued that the 30% commissions the big companies take of every game transaction is unfair and that Epic should be able to directly sell its in-app goods to players for lower prices. Epic only charges 12% as a fee for developers in its own store.

After Epic modified the iOS version of Fortnite

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Google v. Oracle, a decade-long war over the future of software, neared its end in the Supreme Court this week as a battle of metaphors. Over the course of two hours, justices and attorneys compared Java — the coding language that Oracle acquired in 2010 — to a restaurant menu, a hit song, a football team, an accounting system, the instructions for finding a blend of spices in a grocery store, a safecracking manual, and the QWERTY keyboard layout.

“Prediction: The side that wins the metaphor battle will win the case,” tweeted University of Oklahoma College of Law professor Sarah Burstein.

The reliance on familiar analogies wasn’t necessarily surprising. Google v. Oracle covers a complex question: what elements of computer code can be copyrighted, and if that code is covered by copyright, when it’s still legal to use pieces of it under fair use. The argument dates back a

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(Reuters) — The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in

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Paris court to rule on talks

October 8, 2020 | technology | No Comments

A Paris appeals court is to rule Thursday on whether France’s competition authority overstepped its jurisdiction in ordering Google to negotiate with media groups in a dispute about digital copyright.

The ruling comes as it was announced the US firm had made progress in those talks, and that it could be on the verge of making EU digital copyright payments to some media groups for the first time.

The keenly awaited ruling is the latest chapter in a long-running fight with European news companies demanding payment for content displayed in Google search results.

The US internet giant has refused to comply with an EU law requiring it to compensate the press for content displayed on its search engine.

Google has said that articles, pictures and videos will be shown in search results only if media groups consent to let it use them for free.

The company argues that news companies

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In a landmark moment in the history of the U.S. software industry, the Supreme Court held a hearing today on a long-running legal dispute that pits tech giants Oracle and Google against one another.

The case centers around whether or not a key foundation of today’s increasingly software-driven economy—blocks of code known as “application programming interfaces”, or APIs—is subject to copyright protection. Oracle claims Google infringed copyright when it used elements of the Oracle-owned Java programming language to build its Android operating system, which now powers billions of smartphones and other devices. Google denies the claim, which involves about 11,500 lines of code out of millions of new lines that it wrote to create Android. The two companies have been battling one another in the courts for over a decade, with Oracle demanding $9 billion in compensation.

The outcome of this epic

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KEY POINTS

  • Oral arguments were held before the Supreme Court over the copyright case between Oracle and Google
  • Google stands to pay Oracle nearly $9 billion for 11,000 lines of code in Android software if the court rules in Oracle’s favor
  • Big tech is throwing in behind Google while media and entertainment companies and the Trump administration is backing Oracle

The Supreme Court faces upending the tech industry by determining whether Google stole code from Oracle in building its Android operating system in a case that could redefine the meaning of the fair use doctrine. All eight justices on Wednesday grilled the tech giants’ legal teams as well the U.S. deputy solicitor general in a potentially far-reaching case.

Google said its incorporation of 11,500 lines of Oracle Java code constitutes fair use, while Oracle argued the action violated its ownership rights. The lawsuit has been working its way through the

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