Tag Archive : Google

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Google contractors who recently unionized say their jobs are being slowly shipped to Poland. On Thursday, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed a complaint laying out the allegations against HCL America, an engineering and IT contractor that works with Google in Pittsburgh.



a sign on the side of a building


© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


Obtained by Motherboard, the complaint argues the jobs are being outsourced in retaliation for legitimate union activity. In particular, the NLRB says the conduct took place “because employees formed, joined and assisted the Union and engaged in concerted activities, and to discourage employees from engaging in these activities.”

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None of the affected workers are legal employees of Google, but they specialize in engineering and IT tasks for HCL. The contractors voted to unionize in 2019, organizing under the United Steelworkers union. According to the complaint, the company has failed to bargain with the newly formed unit

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Learn best practices for ranking on Google

October 9, 2020 | seo | No Comments

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the art and science of getting your website and content to show up on Google’s first page. Not only is it a lucrative job on its own, but it’s a skill every marketer should have.

All products featured here are independently selected by our editors and writers.If you buy something through links on our site, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission.

Whether you’re in marketing, a business owner, or consider yourself inherently tech-savvy, you’ve probably heard the term SEO (Search Engine Optimization) bounced around quite a bit lately — and for good reason. Search engine ranking can be one of the most important factors when it comes to a business succeeding in the digital age.

What is SEO?

SEO stands for “search engine optimization.” It’s the practice of strategizing the content and keywords on a web page and site

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Google Pixel 4a 5G in hand front of phone 2

Now that the Pixel 4a 5G and Pixel 5 are official, we’ve got three different Pixels to choose from this year. There’s the Pixel 4a, which costs a cool $349, the 4a 5G, which adds some faster networking, a faster processor, and an extra camera for $499, and the Pixel 5, which adds a premium build, wireless charging, a 90Hz display, water resistance, and a bigger battery, for $699.

Between those three, the 4a 5G seems like the middle ground a lot of people are looking for. It has the biggest display of the three at 6.2-inches, the wide-angle camera everyone wanted last year, and a chip that’s perfectly future-proof with 5G connectivity. While it still lacks the extras like wireless charging and a 90Hz display sported on the Pixel 5, a lot of people won’t care about those things, and just want something that works for a good price.

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In the stone ages of mobile a couple of years ago, you actually had to tap on an app icon and open an app in order to access its functionality. While backwards, onerous, and tedious, this ensured that if I was ordering Air Jordans from Shoe Giant #1 or a Big Mac from Ronald McDonald, I would have at least a couple of interactions with the Nike brand or McDonalds.

Now, now so much.

Today, Google announced that “Hey Google” is the new front door to your app’s functionality:

  • Hey Google: order a smoothie from Postmates
  • Hey Google: send a message on Discord

  • Hey Google: start my run with Nike Run Club
  • Hey Google: start
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microsoft-logo-laptop-3802

Angela Lang/CNET

Microsoft announced 10 new app store principles in a blog post Thursday, needling Apple’s and Google’s policies in the process. The new guidelines from Microsoft are intended to promote choice, fairness and innovation for software developers on Windows 10.

“Developers will have the freedom to choose whether to distribute their apps for Windows through our app store. We will not block competing app stores on Windows.” the first principle reads.

“Windows 10 is an open platform. Unlike some other popular digital platforms, developers are free to choose how they distribute their apps,” the tech giant wrote, alluding to Apple and Google.

Those companies are embroiled in a legal battle with Fortnite developer Epic over fees they charge in their respective app stores.

Earlier this month, lawmakers

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A federal agency issued a complaint this week against a contractor hired by Google and accused it of violating its employees’ labor rights, marking the latest flash point in a long-running struggle between workers and technology companies.

In the complaint, the National Labor Relations Board asserts that HCL America, a subsidiary of an Indian contracting giant, illegally discouraged workers from belonging to a union, and of failing to bargain with the union in good faith.

HCL and Google did not immediately respond to requests for comment. The case does not accuse Google of wrongdoing.

A group of about 90 HCL employees in Pittsburgh who do work such as data analysis under a contract the company has with Google voted to unionize last fall. They affiliated with the United Steelworkers union.

According to the complaint, managers at the company interrogated workers about the organizing activities of their colleagues, told them that

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It looks increasingly likely that Google will soon roll out a built-in screen recorder and improved screenshot feature for millions of Chromebooks. 

Last month Chrome Story spotted a reference to a built-in screen recorder feature for Chrome OS that popped up in the Chromium Gerrit. Today, Chrome Unboxed found a partially functional version of the feature in the Canary channel of Chrome OS, which is a development channel where new, not widely tested (and possibly buggy or unfinished), Chrome OS features can be trailed.

The new capture mode adds an icon to the Chrome OS taskbar, which gives users options to screen record or screen capture. In a video, Chrome Unboxed showed off how exactly the new features work, including options to take movable screenshots and resize them. Users can also capture a specific window. 

Screen

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When Google introduced the capability to play Stadia games over a 4G or 5G connection, it was as a feature the tech giant was still in the midst of testing. Now, it looks like Google is done putting the feature through its paces, because the option to toggle it on has been moved from the Experiments section to the Performance tab. Reports posted on Reddit and Twitter (via 9to5Google) show the toggle in its new place in the Performance tab under Resolution.



Google


Google

The option comes with a note telling players that their resolution will be limited to 720p on mobile data, most likely as a way to help users keep their data use in check. Google also warns users that enabling the feature to play games on Stadia could increase their data usage by up to 2.7GB/hour. In addition, Stadia will now make sure users know they’ve enabled gaming

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In a landmark moment in the history of the U.S. software industry, the Supreme Court held a hearing today on a long-running legal dispute that pits tech giants Oracle and Google against one another.

The case centers around whether or not a key foundation of today’s increasingly software-driven economy—blocks of code known as “application programming interfaces”, or APIs—is subject to copyright protection. Oracle claims Google infringed copyright when it used elements of the Oracle-owned Java programming language to build its Android operating system, which now powers billions of smartphones and other devices. Google denies the claim, which involves about 11,500 lines of code out of millions of new lines that it wrote to create Android. The two companies have been battling one another in the courts for over a decade, with Oracle demanding $9 billion in compensation.

The outcome of this epic

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KEY POINTS

  • Oral arguments were held before the Supreme Court over the copyright case between Oracle and Google
  • Google stands to pay Oracle nearly $9 billion for 11,000 lines of code in Android software if the court rules in Oracle’s favor
  • Big tech is throwing in behind Google while media and entertainment companies and the Trump administration is backing Oracle

The Supreme Court faces upending the tech industry by determining whether Google stole code from Oracle in building its Android operating system in a case that could redefine the meaning of the fair use doctrine. All eight justices on Wednesday grilled the tech giants’ legal teams as well the U.S. deputy solicitor general in a potentially far-reaching case.

Google said its incorporation of 11,500 lines of Oracle Java code constitutes fair use, while Oracle argued the action violated its ownership rights. The lawsuit has been working its way through the

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