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  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas

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Democratic party volunteers pose at an event in Rome aimed at encouraging U.S. citizens abroad to vote in the forthcoming presidential election. REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo


© REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo
Democratic party volunteers pose at an event in Rome aimed at encouraging U.S. citizens abroad to vote in the forthcoming presidential election. REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business
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The U.S. military has picked SpaceX and L3Harris Technologies to build up a new missile-warning satellite system in space.

In separate contracts, SpaceX and L3Harris will each provide four infrared satellites devoted to missile tracking as part of the larger National Defense Space Architecture program. The contract, awarded by the Department of Defense’s Space Development Agency (SDA), gives $193.5 million to L3Harris and $149 million to SpaceX. The satellites should be ready by the end of fiscal year 2022. 

“The satellites will be able to provide missile tracking data for hypersonic glide vehicles, and the next generation of advanced missile threats,” Derek Tournear, SDA director, said in a statement.

Related: What is a ballistic missile and how does it work?

SpaceX, originally a launch provider using its Falcon rockets, has entered the satellite construction market with its Starlink constellation of internet satellites. The company has launched more

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A stack of SpaceX Starlink satellites being deployed in orbit.


SpaceX

SpaceX is now in the business of building satellites that do more than beam broadband around the globe. Elon Musk’s space company is one of two companies awarded a contract from the Space Development Agency (part of the US Department of Defense) to build four satellites each that can track missile threats from low-Earth orbit.

SpaceX will receive over $149 million for the job, while major defense contractor L3 Harris will receive over $193 million, SDA announced on Monday. 

The satellites will be developed around an infrared sensor with a wide field of view that can track even hypersonic missiles. The SpaceX satellite will be based around the guts of the Starlink satellite, but the sensor will come from another supplier, Space Development Agency

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NEW YORK, Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Task & Purpose, a leading digital media website for active-duty military members, veterans, and their families, announced today it was joining the Brookline Media network of sites, immediately creating one of the largest footprints in the military-focused media market.

“I launched Task & Purpose to give a platform and voice to our remarkable servicemen and women,” said Zach Iscol, Task & Purpose co-founder. “And I could not be prouder of all the team has achieved, from taking on difficult topics like sexual harassment and how we care for our sick and wounded to supporting Gold Star families and telling the stories of unsung heroes and fallen warriors, and so much more.”

“With Brookline’s expertise in digital media, complementary audiences, and passion for supporting our nation’s troops, I couldn’t think of a better team to be working with moving forward to

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Mothers are using a label maker to tidy their homes with military precision for spring, eliminating the hassle of rummaging in drawers forever.

The craze began when an Australian woman posted photos of her immaculately organised home in a Facebook group.

She told members she used the $460 ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut from arts and crafts store Spotlight to label storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne.

The machine – which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather – heralds the end to rooting and misplacing belongings because the contents of containers can be clearly displayed on the front.

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A mother used the ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut from Spotlight to label everything from storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne

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US wariness of Chinese tech firms was underlined again Friday, when the Commerce Department sent a letter to companies in the states reportedly telling them they must get a license before exporting certain goods to China’s largest chipmaker, because of concerns about military use of technology.



a traffic light hanging off the side of a building: The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images


© Provided by CNET
The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images

The Commerce Department said in the letter that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation “may pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China,” according to a Saturday report by The New York Times.

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Last year, the US placed restrictions on companies selling gear to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei , over concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.

And popular video app TikTok,

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