Tag Archive : Misinformation

/ Misinformation

Online misinformation is leaching out from cheap mobile phones and free Facebook plans used by millions in the Philippines, convincing many to reject vaccinations for polio and other deadly diseases.

Childhood immunisation rates have plummeted in the country — from 87 percent in 2014 to 68 percent — resulting in a measles epidemic and the reemergence of polio last year.

A highly politicised campaign that led to the withdrawal of dengue vaccine Dengvaxia in 2017 is widely seen as one of the main drivers of the fall.

But health experts also point to an explosion of vaccination-related misinformation that has undermined confidence in all types of immunisations.

In the northern city of Tarlac, government nurse Reeza Patriarca watched with horror the impacts of Facebook posts that falsely claimed five people had died after receiving an unspecified vaccination.

The posts, which have been shared thousands of times, went online in August,

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Oct. 6 (UPI) — Facebook and Twitter blocked a post Tuesday from President Donald Trump for spreading COVID-19 misinformation.

Trump’s post falsely claimed that the COVID-19 is less deadly than the seasonal flu, prompting Twitter to hide the post on its platform and Facebook to remove the post altogether.

The United States had “learned to live with,” the flu season “just like we are learning to live with Covid, in most populations far less lethal!,” Trump’s post reads.

Doctors and scientists are working to estimate the mortality rate of COVID-19, but it is thought to be substantially higher — possibly 10 times or more — than that of most strains of the flu, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Trump’s post is hidden behind a warning label on Twitter and users must click on “View” to see it.

“This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information

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Twitter  (TWTR) – Get Report is reassessing how its misinformation labels appear and reach users, the microblogging site’s head of site integrity told a news service.

The San Francisco social-media company currently attaches small blue notices to false tweets.

It is assessing how to make these signals more “overt” and “direct,” Twitter’s Yoel Roth told Reuters.

Roth made no mention of whether the changes would be implemented before the Nov. 3 U.S. election.

The changes will include testing a reddish-magenta color that is more visible, Roth told the news service.

Twitter reduces the reach of tweets that it labels for false content by limiting their visibility and not recommending them in search results, Reuters reported.

Feedback from users tells the company that they want to know whether an account has been repeatedly labeled, Roth said. Twitter will consider whether to flag users who constantly post false information, he

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Facebook
and Twitter
on Tuesday both took action against a post from President Donald Trump that falsely suggested the seasonal flu was more deadly than COVID-19. Facebook removed the post, while Twitter hid the post behind a warning message that says it violated the site’s rules “about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.” Twitter said the tweet was in the public’s interest, so it’ll remain accessible but engagements will be limited.

Facebook and Twitter both have rules against coronavirus
misinformation that could lead to harm, such as claiming a certain group is immune or promoting drinking bleach as a cure, which can be deadly. Facebook has been under fire for not sending posts from politicians to fact-checkers. Politicians, though, aren’t exempted from the social network’s rules against coronavirus misinformation.

“We remove incorrect information about the severity of COVID-19, and have now removed this post,” a Facebook spokeswoman

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Twitter has confirmed it’s working on a new feature, currently dubbed “Birdwatch,” that could let the Twitter community warn one another about misleading tweets that could cause harm.

There’s an awful lot we don’t know about the idea, including whether Twitter will actually release it to the public or how it might work in its final form, but enough has leaked out that we do have a pretty fair glimpse — which, we understand, is still early in development and would not be released ahead of the US election.

As TechCrunch notes, the existence of such a tool was first discovered by Jane Manchun Wong, who often digs through app code for evidence of unreleased features, back in August. At a basic level, the idea is that you’ll be able to attach a note to a misleading tweet:

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By Amanda Seitz and Beatrice Dupuy | Associated Press

CHICAGO — News Friday that President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 sparked an explosion of rumors, misinformation and conspiracy theories that in a matter of hours littered the social media feeds of many Americans.

Tweets shared thousands of times claimed Democrats might have somehow intentionally infected the president with the coronavirus during the debates. Others speculated in Facebook posts that maybe the president was faking his illness. And the news also ignited constant conjecture among QAnon followers, who peddle a baseless belief that Trump is a warrior against a secret network of government officials and celebrities that they falsely claim is running a child trafficking ring.

In the final weeks of the presidential campaign, Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis was swept into an online vortex of coronavirus misinformation and the falsehoods swirling around this polarizing election.

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CHICAGO (AP) — News Friday that President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 sparked an explosion of rumors, misinformation and conspiracy theories that in a matter of hours littered the social media feeds of many Americans.

Tweets shared thousands of times claimed Democrats might have somehow intentionally infected the president with the coronavirus during the debates. Others speculated in Facebook posts that maybe the president was faking his illness. And the news also ignited constant conjecture among QAnon followers, who peddle a baseless belief that Trump is a warrior against a secret network of government officials and celebrities that they falsely claim is running a child trafficking ring.

In the final weeks of the presidential campaign, Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis was swept into an online vortex of coronavirus misinformation and the falsehoods swirling around this polarizing election. Trump himself has driven much of that confusion

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And on the video platform TikTok, four grainy videos alleging that Biden was wearing a wire to “cheat” during the debate racked up more than half a million combined views on Wednesday, according to research by the left-leaning media watchdog group Media Matters. One of the videos shows a still of Biden with his hand inside his suit, while another overlays an arrow over Biden’s tie, but neither video shows any visual evidence of Biden wearing an electronic device of any kind.

Tech companies have long struggled with misinformation and are on high-alert going into the election. Ahead of the debate, Twitter and Facebook executives reviewed hashtags, trends, and other accounts that may break the companies’ rules using a combination of software and human review. The companies are also pushing out accurate information about how to register to vote to millions of people.

But the latest evidence shows that they

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KEY POINTS

  • Joe Biden’s campaign has accused Facebook of not enforcing its guidelines in order to avoid removing misinformation from Donald Trump and his campaign
  • Facebook’s policies purportedly ban such posts, but the content has remained up with only a warning attached.
  • Twitter has taken a more proactive stance, hiding misinformation, suspending even prominent sources and banning political ads altogether

Facebook is under fire again, accused of not following its own rules mandating the removal of misinformation.

Those policies,  if enforced, would place the social media giant on a collision course with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.  Facebook rarely removes misinformation posted by Trump or his campaign, but Twitter has shown a willingness for more aggressive action.

In a scathing letter acquired by Axios, Joe Biden’s campaign manager Jen O’Malley Dillon said that Facebook has consistently declined to take action against content such as this video from Donald Trump Jr. The

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