Tag Archive : Science

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If women are underrepresented in computer science (and they are, by a large margin), you wouldn’t know it from sitting in on the Grace Hopper Celebration. Each fall, for the last 20 years, tens of thousands of women have converged for a long weekend of collaboration, networking, mentoring and commemoration of their contributions to the tech world.

COVID-19 pushed this fall’s convention into a virtual format, but it didn’t prevent the University of Denver’s Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science from sending 26 students (plus seven faculty and one staff member) for free. A private donor and funds from the school’s diversity, equity and inclusion budget covered the costs.

In interviews via email and Zoom, the DU Newsroom asked Anndi Russell, a graduate student in the data science program; Izzy Johnson, an undergraduate pursuing a BS in computer science; and Scott Leutenegger, a computer science professor and the Ritchie

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The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in

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Even when leaders proclaim in their townhalls that your organization needs to be more agile and nimble, they can’t mandate it. Your CIO and IT leaders may standardize on practices, metrics, and responsibilities that they describe as agile methodology standards, but they can’t dictate that everyone adopts agile cultures and mindsets.

You can select agile tools, automate more with devops practices, and enable citizen data science programs, but you can’t force adoption and demand employee happiness. IT operations may operate a hybrid multicloud architecture, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that costs are optimized or that infrastructure can scale up and down auto-magically.

So, if you were looking to quickly standardize your agile processes, or to miraculously address technical debt by shifting to agile architectures, or to instantly transform into an agile way of working, then I am sorry to disappoint you. Agility doesn’t come free, cheap, or easily. You can’t

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bg pranav&sneha_sp robotic worksImage: P Ravi Kumar

Sneha Priya’s mantra to introduce any technology is simple: the right exposure at the right age. “It must not be the other way around—just making it compulsory for the kids,” says cofounder of SP Robotic Works. Decoding the hysteria around coding for children in India, Priya concedes that the way it (coding) is being communicated to the parents, and the kind of FOMO being created, is probably not going in the right direction. “But if a kid embraces coding, it will be useful for her future,” she says. 

Started in 2012 by Pranavan and Sneha Priya, SP Robotic Works is an online edutainment company that specialises in providing experiential learning to students between the ages of 7 and 17, in latest technologies such as robotics, coding, drone, AI, VR and IoT. The idea is to promote STEM education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) through

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Press release from the Office of Senator Kevin Witkos:

Oct. 11, 2020

State Senator Kevin Witkos (R-Canton) is honored to announce that he has recently received a Leadership Award from the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) and ReadyCT for his work in supporting computer science education in Connecticut. The award was recently presented during the CSTA & ReadyCT Virtual Summit held on October 2nd.

“I am honored to have received this award and I’m so proud of the efforts we’ve made over the past few years in ensuring computer science becomes part of the curriculum for students across Connecticut and that our teachers recognize the importance of this field. With many industries and sectors of our economy becoming more technological and digital, computer science skills are more important than ever. I’m proud of the bipartisan work that went into passing this legislation and so thankful for the work of CSTA,

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Judea Pearl, chancellor’s professor of computer science at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, has been recognized with the Classic AI Paper Award given by the AI Journal for his paper “Temporal Constraint Networks” along with coauthors Rina Dechter and Itay Meiri, both of whom were UCLA students at the time of publishing.

This award, Pearl’s second Classic Paper Award, is UCLA’s third; Pearl received his first in 2015 for his paper on Bayesian networks and Rich Korf won in 2016 for his seminal paper in real-time heuristic search over the basic state model considered in AI. Only papers that are “exceptional in their significance and impact” and were published at least 15 calendar years ago in the AI Journal are eligible for the AIJ Classic Paper Award.

In 1990, Pearl, Dechter, and Meiri offered a polynomial time algorithm in their paper to solve a simple problem: finding one or

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Harvard is piloting a new teaching fellow training focused on diversity, inclusion, and belonging in two Computer Science courses this fall.

The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning; the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences’s Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging; and the Computer Science department created the training. It has debuted in Computer Science 121: “Introduction to Theoretical Computer Science” and Computer Science 61: “Systems Programming and Machine Organization.”

The training is composed of two parts, according to Nari G. Johnson ’21, a member of the Harvard Women in Computer Science Advocacy Council and organizer of the program. An asynchronous component on Canvas invites participants to read about diversity, inclusion, and belonging at SEAS. A second component include live discussions, role playing, and personal reflections.

CS 121 teaching fellows and instructors completed their live synchronous training last week in a session led by SEAS Assistant Director of Diversity,

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“The Science Femme” claimed to be a female academic. She claimed to have upended efforts by her social justice-obsessed department to draft a statement condemning racism.

And when Twitter users accused her of racism, she claimed to be a woman of color herself—and an immigrant to boot.

But The Science Femme, who tweeted from the handle @piney_the, wasn’t any of those things, digital sleuths began alleging late last month. Instead, they claimed, “she” was Craig Chapman, a white male assistant professor of chemistry at the University of New Hampshire. The allegations, bolstered by an internal chemistry department email, would make Chapman at least the fourth white academic revealed to have posed as a person of color in recent weeks.

In three of those cases, academics are accused of shamelessly trying to further their own careers. But in Chapman’s case, Twitter users who came into contact with @piney_the say the account

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Emblematic of the barriers to learning computer science that girls have faced for years, a new Google/Gallup report shows that girls are less likely than boys to express interest in pursuing a career in computer science. About one in eight girls (12%) in grades seven through 12 in the U.S. say they are likely to pursue a career in computer science someday. Nearly three times as many boys (33%) say they are likely to pursue a career in this field.

Girls Less Likely Than Boys to Pursue Computer Science Career

How likely are you to pursue a job in computer science someday?







U.S. students Female students Male students
% % %
Very likely 10 4 15
4 13 8 17
3 27 25 30
2 25
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Hamilton County Schools’ latest partnership with Amazon will benefit tens of thousands of students, officials said.

The American multinational technology company plans to fund a computer science initiative — influencing more than 21,700 Hamilton County students in 42 elementary schools as part of its Amazon Future Engineer program. Amazon is also working with BootUp , a nonprofit professional development provider helping teachers bridge the equity skill gaps among the students.

The company’s commitment to the school district is part of a $50 million nationwide investment towards STEM education, primarily through the program. The area campuses will join more than 60 high schools and more than 80 elementary schools already participating in the program statewide.

Through a news release, Hamilton County Superintendent Bryan Johnson said the partnership will help the district reach one of its goals of students being prepared for success after graduation. The objective is part of the district’s

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